Anna Soubry asks a Question on Road Accidents

Anna Soubry: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people were (a) killed and (b) injured as a result of road accidents in which a blind spot of a vehicle was found to be the primary cause in each of the last five years.

Mike Penning: It is not possible to identify accidents where the blind spot of a vehicle caused an accident.

However, the following table shows, for accidents where “vehicle blind spot” was a reported contributory factor, the number of casualties who were (a) killed and (b) injured in each of the last five years:

Casualties
(a) Killed(b) Injured

2005

22

2,079

2006

25

2,102

2007

27

2,079

2008

25

1,908

2009

22

2,081

Note: Includes only accidents where a police officer attended the scene and in which a contributory factor was reported.

Anna Soubry: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he is taking to reduce the number of road deaths and injuries attributable to vehicle blind spots.

Mike Penning: European legislation came into effect in January 2007 requiring all new goods vehicles above 3.5 tonnes gross mass to be fitted with an enhanced “wide-angle” mirror on both sides and an enhanced “close proximity” mirror on the passenger side of the cab. For new vehicles over 7.5 tonnes gross mass a “front” mirror above the windscreen is also required. Vehicles where the “close proximity” and “front” mirrors cannot be fitted over 2 metres from the ground are exempt.

Click Here to read the orignal transcript from Hansard